Tagged: Pearl Harbor

December 7th, 1941 – 75 years ago !

Yesterday, December 7, 1941–a date which will live in infamy–the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.”
At 7:55 a.m. on a Sunday morning Hawaii time, a Japanese dive bomber bearing the red symbol of the Rising Sun of Japan on its wings appears out of the clouds above the island of Oahu. A swarm of 360 Japanese warplanes followed, descending on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in a ferocious assault. The surprise attack struck a critical blow against the U.S. Pacific fleet and drew the United States irrevocably into World War II. Read more »

December 7th 2015

Doolittle RaidDecember 7th falls on a Monday this year. It fell on a Sunday in the year 1941. We celebrate in this year of 2015, the 74th anniversary of the attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor.

On April 18th , 1942 we answered the attack on U.S. soil by an attack of our own on Japanese soil.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: the Doolittle Raid:

“The Doolittle Raid, also known as the Tokyo Raid, on 18 April 1942, was an air raid by the United States on the Japanese capital Tokyo and other places on Honshu Island during World War II, the first air raid to strike the Japanese Home Islands. It demonstrated that Japan itself was vulnerable to American air attack, served as retaliation for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, and provided an important boost to U.S. morale while damaging Japanese morale. The raid was planned and led by Lieutenant Colonel James “Jimmy” Doolittle, U.S. Army Air Forces.

“Sixteen U.S. Army Air Forces B-25B Mitchell medium bombers were launched without fighter escort from the U.S. Navy’s aircraft carrier USS Hornet deep in the Western Pacific Ocean, each with a crew of five men. The plan called for them to bomb military targets in Japan, and to continue westward to land in China—re-landing a medium bomber on Hornet was impossible. Fifteen of the aircraft reached China, and one landed in the Soviet Union. All but three of the crew survived, but all the aircraft were lost. Eight crewmen were captured by the Japanese Army in China; three of them were executed. The B-25 that landed in the Soviet Union at Vladivostok was confiscated and its crew interned for more than a year. Fourteen crews, except for one crewman, returned either to the United States or to American forces.” Read more »

Thoughts on December 6th, and 7th.

Before 10:00 a.m. on the morning of December 6th of this year 2014, I called a cowboy friend of mine who lives in Texas and wished him a happy birthday. He was born on Dec. 6th 1941, a day before Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. So that this good man is not overwhelmed with a flood of phone calls, I’ll not mention his name. I do know that “Cowboy” is a highly decorated Vietnam veteran. That’s a conflict I had a part in – a very small part to be sure. But this is about the willingness to shed the blood, to experience the pain – for a greater purpose.

This thought reminded me of a quote that reads: “Only two forces have ever offered to die for you. 1. Jesus Christ, 2. The American G.I. One died for your soul, the other for your freedom.” British Prime Minister Tony Blair was credited with saying that in a speech, but according to Snopes.com, he didn’t say that. It came from an unknown internet forwarder who penned it. Nonetheless, I appreciated what seemed to me that morning of December 6th to indicate somewhat of a parallel. This is not a religious blog per se’ but my thoughts of the time are explained in the paragraphs to follow.

At 6:00 p.m. of the same day December 6th 2014 I attended a dedication ceremony of the Tabernacle in the Wilderness at the Leslie Hale teaching ministry in Tarpon Springs, Florida. More on that in a minute or so. It was the eve of Pearl Harbor Day. Read more »