Tagged: Marines

Landing at Okinawa

                                                            

 

Landing at Okinawa



1 Apr-21 Jun 1945

From Peter Chen:

It was April 1st, 1945. April 1st was Easter. April 1st was April Fools day. April 1st was the beginning of the battle for Okinawa. It was under what was known as Operation Iceberg.

Operation Iceberg struck the island of Okinawa in the Ryukyu Islands on that date of April 1st , 1945.  Okinawa was a relatively large island, 60 miles long and eight miles wide; it was the largest of the Ryukyu Archipelago situated between Taiwan and Japan. Immediately to its west was the small island of Ie Shima. Before the landing operation started, Allied bombers softened Okinawa of its defenses and morale, which resulted in the destruction of over 80% of the city of Naha and the sinking of over 65 boats. Admiral Richmond Turner, veteran commander of amphibious forces, delivered landing forces, with ships of the British Pacific Fleet among his vanguard. The amphibious vehicles landed the 96th and 7th Army Divisions on the left flank, and the 1st and 6th Marine Divisions were delivered on the right. Once on land, the combined forces of Chester Nimitz’s Marines and Douglas MacArthur’s soldiers, the first time their men fought side-by-side, were placed under the command of Lieutenant General Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. The landing was not resisted, much to the surprise of the landers. There were no coastal guns, no mortars, and no machine guns; it was a scene very much unlike the previous landings elsewhere in the Pacific Ocean. Deep in the island, however, the 110,000-strong Japanese garrison led by Lieutenant General Mitsuru Ushijima, augmented by 20,000 volunteer Okinawan militiamen, awaited. Read more »

It is June 15th!

It is June 15th, 2015. It was 71 years ago on June 15th, 1944 that Admiral Turner, Commander of the Expeditionary Force of Operation Foreger ordered: “Land the Landing force.” The time was 0542. H-Hour (the time the 1st wave of amphibious vehicles was scheduled to hit the beaches) was 0830. The place was the island of Saipan.It was WWII.
Assault elements of the 2nd and 4th Marine Divisions were carried in 34 LSTs (Landing Ship Tanks) to a place about 4000 yards from the shore of the island. That place would be “the line of departure.” 12 more LSTs carrying artillery were right behind the 34. Read more »

Pain and Purpose in the Pacific


Pain and Purpose in the Pacific book cover-1

Pain and Purpose in the Pacific: True Reports of War
Pain and Purpose in the Pacific offers a unique glimpse of Marines, Air Corps, Soldiers, and Sailors to include Coast Guard at war and the family and friends they leave behind. Bright bridges a historical look at World War II with vignettes of the realities of war, giving the reader a clear-eyed view of what it means to live and die in service of your country.

In Pain and Purpose in the Pacific: True Reports of War (published by Trafford Publishing), author Richard Carl Bright tells the stories of his uncle Carl Johnson, an American Marine who spent 30 months in the Pacific during WWII. As the United States Marine Corps fought costly campaigns in the Pacific, Carl saw bitter combat on the islands of Saipan, Tinian and Okinawa.

In this moving work, Bright, who lived for seven years on Saipan, puts a human face on the tragedies of war, ushering readers into the darkest pits of destruction (the pain) and into the brightest views of hope and redemption (the purpose). Bright traces his Uncle Carl’s travels during World War II, from his homeland in Minnesota to the battle-torn islands of the Pacific, all the way to Japan. Bright, a veteran of Vietnam, colors his prose with his personal experiences and observations by traveling to many of the Pacific locations, including Iwo Jima, the Marianas Islands, Peleliu and the Philippines. He also personally interviewed Carl’s Platoon Sergeant, Arthur Wells, who fought at Carl’s side. Read more »