Tagged: battles

Operation Iceberg, Love day, Easter, and April Fools!

2980562321_1_3_lLkoYYi6Happy Resurrection Day!!  That is the day we celebrate as I write this blog today March 27, 2016. This day is more commonly known as Easter.  71 years ago it was Easter April 1st, 1945. It was also “Love day” and April Fools day all at the same time. It was also the day to begin “OPERATION ICEBERG.” So what does an Iceberg have in common with Love, and Easter? Well certainly there was and is Love with the Resurrection,   but would it be the same in the operation of Fools? I mean – remember the Titanic and the iceberg? The ship was lost. Ships were also lost in this – Operation Iceberg.  Does April Fools day have a play here? I have an opinion that one group of men mentioned in this writing may have been deceived into thinking they were doing the right thing for their emperor, but maybe they had been fooled.  The one who was resurrected will be that judge. So what was the Operation Iceberg? The following will explain it.

OPERATION ICEBERG was about the battle for Okinawa.   “Love Day” was the name given to the 1st day of the landings. Those landings would commence at 0406 on April 1st, Love Day, which was also Easter Sunday and April Fools Day. It was that time on that special day that Admiral Turner announced “Land the Landing Force!”  Read the story in “Pain and Purpose in the Pacific.”  But first, here is a bit of the history. Read more »

The 70th Anniversary of the End of the Second World War.

This is the 70th anniversary of the end of WWII.

s212246From an article written by C. Peter Chen as seen in an internet search of Japan’s surrender:
“With the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki destroyed by atomic weapons, the will of the Japanese leadership was tested. Then came the news that the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, with troops crossing into northeastern China an hour later. These three reasons led to Emperor Showa’s decision to break the deadlock at his council which debated fruitlessly whether or not to respond to the Allies’ call for unconditional surrender. The Emperor said at the Imperial conference:

“Continuation of the war does not promise successful conclusion no matter from what angle the situation is considered. Therefore I have decided, without suggestions from anyone, to order the conclusion of the war, as I cannot endure the thought of having to kill tens, evens hundreds of thousands of my subjects, and moreover to have to be called the disturber of world peace. Moreover, it is extremely difficult for me to have to turn over to the Allied authorities officers and men upon whom I have depended all this time as though they were part of my own body. But I have decided to endure what is unendurable and to accept the terms of the Potsdam Declaration.” Read more »

Pain and Purpose in the Pacific


Pain and Purpose in the Pacific book cover-1

Pain and Purpose in the Pacific: True Reports of War
Pain and Purpose in the Pacific offers a unique glimpse of Marines, Air Corps, Soldiers, and Sailors to include Coast Guard at war and the family and friends they leave behind. Bright bridges a historical look at World War II with vignettes of the realities of war, giving the reader a clear-eyed view of what it means to live and die in service of your country.

In Pain and Purpose in the Pacific: True Reports of War (published by Trafford Publishing), author Richard Carl Bright tells the stories of his uncle Carl Johnson, an American Marine who spent 30 months in the Pacific during WWII. As the United States Marine Corps fought costly campaigns in the Pacific, Carl saw bitter combat on the islands of Saipan, Tinian and Okinawa.

In this moving work, Bright, who lived for seven years on Saipan, puts a human face on the tragedies of war, ushering readers into the darkest pits of destruction (the pain) and into the brightest views of hope and redemption (the purpose). Bright traces his Uncle Carl’s travels during World War II, from his homeland in Minnesota to the battle-torn islands of the Pacific, all the way to Japan. Bright, a veteran of Vietnam, colors his prose with his personal experiences and observations by traveling to many of the Pacific locations, including Iwo Jima, the Marianas Islands, Peleliu and the Philippines. He also personally interviewed Carl’s Platoon Sergeant, Arthur Wells, who fought at Carl’s side. Read more »